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Celebrating the 20th Anniversary of the Anti-Personnel Mine Ban Convention (Ottawa Treaty)

Disarmament, Diplomatic Relations, Human Rights, International Law, Tánaiste Simon Coveney, Press Releases, Ireland, Global, 2017

Celebrating the 20th Anniversary of the Anti-Personnel Mine Ban Convention (Ottawa Treaty)

The Tánaiste and Minister for Foreign Affairs and Trade, Simon Coveney T.D has welcomed the considerable achievements of the Ottawa Convention which comprehensively banned the use of landmines twenty years ago.

Speaking on the occasion of the 20th anniversary of the Convention, Minister Coveney said:

“Ireland is proud to have played a leadership role in the negotiation of the truly historic and ground-breaking Ottawa Convention on the occasion of its 20th anniversary this week.  Ireland is immensely proud to have been the second country, after Canada, to sign and ratify the Treaty on 3 December 1997.  In that time, over 51 million mines have been destroyed, casualty rates have dropped sharply and previously unusable land has been returned to communities around the world. 

"Ireland continues to support the Ottawa Convention and remains one of the world’s most committed and biggest donors to humanitarian mine action, providing €38 million between 2006 and 2016. We support and believe in the vision of a world free of landmines by 2025, and will continue our endeavours to reach this key objective for humanity”.

 

ENDS
Press Office
7 December 2017

 

Note for Editors

  • Ireland played a leading role in the international movement to ban anti-personnel mines, a process which led to the adoption of the Anti-Personnel Landmine Convention (APLC) in 1997. Ireland was one of the first States to ratify the Convention and today, 163 states in total have ratified it.
  • The Convention not only prohibits the use of anti-personnel landmines, but also commits States to assist in the removal of mines from mine-affected lands. Ireland has been providing support to mine action through Irish Aid since 1994. Ireland’s new Humanitarian Assistance Policy (2015) highlights the links between humanitarian de-mining and development, this includes reconstruction and land clearance which contribute to longer term socio-economic development for affected communities.
  • Ireland has condemned the recent use of landmines on the Myanmar / Bangladesh border, which has resulted in civilian casualties.